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Latest News USA

More feel relations between police, people of color have gotten worse

A year after George Floyd’s death at the hands of police, A plurality of voters said relations between the police and people of color have gotten worse in the past year, a new Hill-HarrisX poll finds.

Forty-five percent of registered voters surveyed said relations between police and communities of color have regressed while 43 percent said they have stayed the same.

By contrast, just 12 percent of respondents said that relations have gotten better.

Of those surveyed, 48 percent of Black voters said relations between the police and people of color have gotten worse while 32 percent said they have stayed the same and 20 percent said they have improved.

Fifty-eight percent of Hispanic voters said things have stayed the same when it came to the relationship between police and people of color while 28 percent said they’ve gotten worse and 15 percent said better.

Forty-eight percent of white voters said things have gotten worse between the police and minorities while 42 percent said they’ve stagnated and 10 percent said they’ve improved.

The survey comes as the country remembered the murder of George Floyd on Tuesday one year ago.

The most recent Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted online among 1,899 registered voters. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.25 percentage points.

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Latest News USA

Memorials and marches mark one year since George Floyd’s death

New York: As the nation honored the life of George Floyd with memorial events and marches, Floyd’s family and supporters said they have been encouraged by the progress made in the year since he was murdered by a Minneapolis police officer.

From Dallas to Washington, DC, to Minneapolis, Floyd’s name is echoing across the country in recognition of a man who has become a symbol in the fight for racial equality and police reform.

“Today I just felt a day of relief,” Floyd’s aunt Angela Harrelson told CNN. “The support that we have received, the love to get to this day. I am just overwhelmed with joy and hope and I feel like change is here.”

Darnella Frazier, the woman who recorded the video of Floyd’s murder, told CNN that she didn’t know Floyd “from a can of paint, but I knew his life mattered.”

“I knew that he was in pain,” Frazier said. “I knew that he was another black man in danger with no power.”

Several members of Floyd’s family, including Floyd’s daughter Gianna, Gianna’s mother, Roxie Washington, and his brother Philonise Floyd were in Washington Tuesday to meet with President Joe Biden, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other lawmakers.

Philonise Floyd, said the meeting with Biden and Harris was “great,” calling President Biden a “genuine guy” who always speaks from the

Biden released a statement saying the Floyd family has shown “extraordinary courage” over the last year.

The family visit comes as the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act remains stalled in the Senate, despite Biden setting an initial goal of having the legislation passed by Tuesday.

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Latest News New York

USA Today editor fired for a tweet on Colorado shooting

New York: A race and inclusion editor for USA Today’s Sports Media Group wrote in a blog post published Friday that she was fired over an inaccurate tweet about the Colorado shooting, and accused the media company of being “subservient to white authority.”

In her Medium post, the editor, Hemal Jhaveri, opened by saying, “I am no longer employed at USA TODAY, a company that was my work home for almost eight years.”

Gannett, which publishes USA Today and hundreds of local newspapers, said in a statement to CNN Business that it holds its “employees accountable” to the principles of “diversity, equity and inclusion.”

“While we can’t discuss personnel matters and don’t want to comment on the specifics of her statements on Medium, we firmly believe in and stand by our principles of diversity and inclusion,” a spokesperson said.

Jhaveri wrote that she was fired after she faced criticism and harassment online over a tweet she posted “responding to the fact that mass shooters are most likely to be white men.” The tweet in question said, wrongly, “It’s always an angry white man. always.” Jhaveri admitted in her post that it was a “dashed off over-generalization.”

She said she apologized and deleted the tweet. “It was a careless error of judgement, sent at a heated time, that doesn’t represent my commitment to racial equality. I regret sending it,” she wrote.

Jhaveri said that on Tuesday “several high profile alt-right Twitter accounts picked up the tweet as an example of anti-white bias and racism against whites.” She said she experienced threats and harassment online and that by the end of the day USA Today had “relieved me of my position.”

“I had always hoped that when that moment inevitably came, USA TODAY would stand by me and my track record of speaking the truth about systemic racism,” Jhaveri wrote. “That, obviously, did not happen.”

In Friday’s post, Jhaveri, who identifies as Indian American, alleged that she faced “constant micro-aggressions and outright racist remarks” while working at USA Today. She alleged the company “never offered public, institutional support” when she experienced fallout from her columns — most recently a piece about Oral Roberts University’s anti-LGBTQ policy. (Source: cnn.com)

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Latest News USA

Statement from AARP California State Director, Nancy McPherson, condemning anti-Asian Hate Crimes

In recent days, California has seen an unnerving wave of racially motivated violence and harassment directed at Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. Even more disturbing is the fact that elders have been targeted in these racist attacks. AARP strongly condemns all racially motivated violence and harassment.

Racism is a poison that infects our society with destructive, divisive rhetoric and violent actions.  We MUST make a commitment to stop racism in all its forms – and this requires a commitment from all members of our communities.

AARP strongly believes that we must stand together to stop racism and work towards dismantling racist narratives. In the words of our founder, Dr. Ethel Percy Andrus, “If we are not content with things as they are, we must concern ourselves with things as they might become.”  We can and must stand together to stop racism and hatred in our communities.

We must all work towards making our communities places of peace and harmony, and we must reject the demeaning stereotypes and violent rhetoric that threaten the sense of safety and security that our communities need to thrive.

AARP urges everyone to learn more about how to fight racism and how to report racist violence and harassment by visiting the California Attorney General’s website, www.oag.ca.gov/hatecrimes. To learn how you can stay safe if you are the victim and how to help if you are a bystander visit stopaapihate.org/together.

 

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India Latest News

Caller on BBC show abuses PM Modi’s mother

New Delhi: In a shocking incident, a caller on a BBC show used derogatory remarks against Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his mother, sparking an outrage in India. The BBC later apologized later.

The incident happened on March 1 during BBC Asian Network’s ‘Big Debate’. Much of the discussion centered on the racial discrimination faced by the Sikhs and Indians in the UK.

EastEnders is a famous British soap opera on air since 1985.

During the show, host Pria Rai and a Sikh lawyer — Harjap Bhangal — were discussing a storyline from the soap opera in which a Sikh character’s turban is referred to as a “crown”.

As the show opened up for calls from viewers, the conversation veered towards the ongoing farmers’ protest in India. During the discussion, a listener identified as Simon called in and began an angry rant.

After he was interrupted by the host, the caller used expletives and derogatory language for Modi’s mother.

The incident sparked an outrage in India and netizens criticized the BBC. Also, #BoycottBBC was trending on Twitter.

Following massive outrage, the recorded version of the three-hour podcast was edited to remove them. The version now available online also features an apology from Rai.

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Business International Latest News USA

Indian restaurant vandalized in Santa Fe, New Mexico

Washington, DC: An Indian restaurant in the Santa Fe City of New Mexico, owned by a Sikh, was broken into and vandalized with hate messages scrawled on its walls, a media report said Tuesday.

The damage caused to India Palace restaurant is estimated to be worth $100,000, local Santa Fe Reporter said adding that the vandalization is being investigated by local police and the FBI.

Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund (SALDEF) has condemned the incident.

“This kind of hate and violence is unacceptable and swift action must be taken to ensure the safety and security of all Americans,” said Kiran Kaur Gill SALDEF executive director.

According to the local daily, tables were overturned, glassware was smashed into piles on the floor, wine racks were emptied, a statue of a goddess was beheaded and computers were stolen.

The vandals also turned over and destroyed food warmers while the front desk area was devastated, plates smashed and the kitchen rendered completely unusable, it said.

“I walked into the kitchen, I saw everything and I was like, hold on, what? What is going on here?” owner Baljit Singh told Santa Fe Reporter. “White power,” “Trump 2020,” “go home,” and far worse were spray-painted on walls, doors, counters and any other available surface.”

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Articles Business Latest News Lifestyle

Johnson & Johnson to cease sale of skin-whitening lotions

Consumer-products giant Johnson & Johnson said Friday that it would no longer sell certain products that are advertised as dark-spot reducers but have been used by some purchasers to lighten skin tone.
The product lines, Neutrogena Fine Fairness and Clear Fairness by Clean & Clear, were not distributed in the United States but were sold in Asia and the Middle East.

“Conversations over the past few weeks highlighted that some product names or claims on our Neutrogena and Clean & Clear dark-spot reducer products represent fairness or white as better than your own unique skin tone,” the company said in a statement. “This was never our intention — healthy skin is beautiful skin.”

The company said its website was being updated to remove links to both products, which may still appear on shelves “for a short while.”

“We will no longer produce or ship the product line,” the company said.

The statement followed a string of announcements this week by companies saying they would be removing brands that have been criticized for using racist imagery to sell products. On Wednesday, the owners of Cream of Wheat, Uncle Ben’s Rice and Mrs. Butterworth’s all said they would be reviewing how the brands’ products are packaged.

Those announcements came after Quaker Oats said it would retire Aunt Jemima, the pancake mix and syrup brand, after acknowledging that its logo, a grinning black woman, was based on a racial stereotype.

In India, where the Clean & Clear skin-lightening line is sold, consumers have posted reviews touting the products’ effects and their ability to lighten skin. In Asia, commercials advertising Neutrogena Fine Fairness have described how it allows a consumer to “whiten more thoroughly.”

More than 11,000 people have signed a petition calling on Unilever to stop selling Fair & Lovely, a skin-lightening product marketed in India and the Middle East. Commercials for the lotion have shown dark-skinned women using it to lighten their skin and then becoming more successful as a result.

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Latest News USA

Trump signs EO on policing amid calls for reform

Washington: President Donald Trump has signed an executive order on policing amid calls for action against police brutality and racism.

It comes three weeks after the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old African American man, in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which has triggered nationwide demonstrations.

 The executive order focuses on three areas: credentialing and certifying police officers; boosting information sharing to track officers accused of excessive use of force; and creating co-responder programs on mental health, drug addiction, and homelessness.

It also said police departments must “prohibit the use of chokeholds — a physical maneuver that restricts an individual’s ability to breathe for the purposes of incapacitation — except in those situations where the use of deadly force is allowed by law.”

Trump, speaking at the White House before signing the executive order, stressed that he “strongly” opposes efforts to defund or dismantle police departments, calling the ideas “radical.”

“Without police, there is chaos. Without law, there is anarchy and without safety, there is catastrophe,” he said.

The move from the White House comes alongside separate efforts on Capitol Hill focused on police reforms, the media reported.

Chuck Schumer, the Senate minority leader, said on Tuesday that Trump’s executive order is not enough.

“While the president has finally acknowledged the need for policing reform, one modest executive order will not make up for his years of inflammatory rhetoric and policies designed to roll back the progress made in previous years,” Schumer said in a statement.

Protests in response to Floyd’s death, and more broadly to police violence, spread across the United States and took place in some other countries.

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Latest News USA

Trump signs executive order on policing amid calls

Washington: US President Donald Trump has signed an executive order on policing amid calls for action against police brutality and racism.

It comes three weeks after the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old African American man, in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which has triggered nationwide demonstrations.

The executive order focuses on three areas: credentialing and certifying police officers; boosting information sharing to track officers accused of excessive use of force; and creating co-responder programs on mental health, drug addiction, and homelessness.

It also said police departments must “prohibit the use of chokeholds — a physical maneuver that restricts an individual’s ability to breathe for the purposes of incapacitation — except in those situations where the use of deadly force is allowed by law.”

Trump, speaking at the White House before signing the executive order, stressed that he “strongly” opposes efforts to defund or dismantle police departments, calling the ideas “radical.”

“Without police, there is chaos. Without law, there is anarchy and without safety, there is catastrophe,” he said.

The move from the White House comes alongside separate efforts on Capitol Hill focused on police reforms, the media reported.

The Democrat-led House introduced a bill last week that aims to ensure officers can be held accountable for misconduct and increase transparency. The Republican-led Senate is also creating its own legislative package that will focus on police reporting, accountability, training and relations.

Chuck Schumer, the Senate minority leader, said on Tuesday that Trump’s executive order is not enough.

“While the president has finally acknowledged the need for policing reform, one modest executive order will not make up for his years of inflammatory rhetoric and policies designed to roll back the progress made in previous years,” Schumer said in a statement.

“Unfortunately, this executive order will not deliver the comprehensive meaningful change and accountability in our nation’s police departments that Americans are demanding,” the New York Democrat added. “Congress needs to quickly pass strong and bold legislation with provisions that makes it easier to hold police officers accountable for abuses, and President Trump must commit to signing it into law.”

Floyd died during an arrest in Minneapolis, Minnesota late last month after a white police officer kneeled on his neck for nearly nine minutes.

Protests in response to Floyd’s death, and more broadly to police violence, spread across the United States and took place in some other countries.

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